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How Your Student Evals Are Killing Your Chances for a FT Job (And Better Pay)

Evaluation

by P.D. Lesko What are the most credible methods and evaluative tools to use when deciding whether to rehire an adjunct faculty member? This is a question that should be asked by hundreds of thousands of college administrators nationwide. Instead, what we get are lazy administrators content to have adjunct faculty evaluations done by the least credible method by the least reliable evaluators: […]

Posted in Blogs,Front News Slider,Lesko Blog | Read More »

Want to Break into Online Learning? Try These Tips

job_search

Online teaching can seem like a great gig. The convenience and flexibility afforded by online delivery is a draw for students and instructors alike. But, finding online teaching jobs seems to be getting more challenging. It’s an unusual situation to see that even though the number of positions increases, there is more competition as the […]

Posted in Blogs,Teaching in Pajamas | Read More »

10 Things Teaching Online Has Taught Me

distance-learning

Michelle Everson I celebrated an anniversary recently. It’s been five years since I taught my first online course. When I first started to think about teaching online, I realized I had a lot to learn. I had never been an online student, nor did I know much about distance education. I just knew I wanted […]

Posted in Blogs,Teaching in Pajamas | Read More »

Adjuncts & Scholarship: An Interview

Sherry Engstrom teaches as an adjunct at the College of Lake County.

by Olivia Baxter Sherry Engstrom, an Adjunct Humanities Instructor at the College of Lake County, was a 2016 Striving for Excellence Adjunct Scholarship Winner. She was presented the opportunity to attend and speak at a panel discussion at the 2016 NISOD Conference in Austin, TX. Sherry talks about the importance of scholarship to adjunct faculty, […]

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Plagiarism vs. Originality: Why I [Heart] Melania Trump

Simpsons_plagiarism

by Diane M. Rubino When I first I started teaching, I knew what plagiarism meant and how it related to schoolwork. But student “cheaters” challenged my beliefs. I also assumed graduate student would submit original work. So it took me by surprise when I noticed a mysterious improvement in one student’s writing capacity, well beyond […]

Posted in Blogs,Part-Time Thoughts | Read More »

Call Me Adjunct

Life as divine comedy: In a single day we can hear from a community college student bemoaning Alice Walker’s choice of the color purple or a military student calling Hamlet a “pussy” for taking the entire play to kill Claudius. In that same day, we can read an essay from a university student detailing what, exactly, those Bronte sisters really did with that Moor.

While all higher educational institutions resemble each other on the surface, each one is bizarre in its own unique way. Universities, for example, make a big production of registering us, completing stacks of paperwork, background checks, fingerprinting, and the like. All this occurs while we carefully navigate Charybdis and Scylla to show a lively interest in the position without exhibiting the desire, or worse, the assumption, that we will be asked to return next semester.

Posted in A Little Raillery,Adjunct By Choice,Blogs,Front News Slider,Opinions | Read More »

How One PTer Won a “Strive for Excellence” Conference Scholarship & You Could, Too!

As an adjunct, there are not a whole lot of opportunities for professional development (though the last couple of years there have been more opportunities at my college). I felt like I had been somewhat out of the loop professionally since I had been working from home for so many years. I saw an opportunity to attend a conference, which I hadn’t done since graduate school, and went for it.--Bethany Fitzpatrick (pictured above)

It’s easy to take myths and, by constant repetition, give them the patina of reality. The same thing is happening in higher education. There are these myths about part-time faculty. Part-time faculty don’t conduct research. Part-time faculty don’t attend academic conferences. Part-time faculty don’t care about professional development. All part-time faculty are “drive-by” professors. The truth […]

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Learning Your Students’ Names Really Does Matter

hello-my-name-is

by Carole R. Beal The new academic year is here, and thousands of students have entered college for the first time. I’ve been teaching college students for a long time, but this year, two developments have led me to think hard about my role as a professor: what it is, or rather, what it should […]

Posted in Blogs,The Mentor Is In | Read More »

Want to Engage the Public in Adjunct Advocacy? Here’s How

Many academics, including us, now realize that if we want to reach people who might benefit from our research, we have to step out of the ivory tower. We academics need to enter the discussion that the rest of the world engages in every day.

Writing for the public requires improving one’s skills, just the way it does for writing an academic article or a grant proposal. Yes, there is a “start-up cost” as you learn the ropes. But it isn’t as time-consuming as many academics may think.

Posted in Blogs,Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

#AdjunctActivism: Thanksgiving Food Drives for Adjuncts

food-drive

This wonderful idea for #adjunctactivism is from our friends at A is for Adjunct. In keeping with this season of tricks and treats, let’s take a look at which of the two seems to be winning in the academic community and how that might be used to adjuncts’ advantages. Realistically, it’s obvious that tricks have abounded […]

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