Cheating

Cheating

(Note: This piece contains examples of bold-faced and unapologetic plagiarism. If that kind of thing bothers you, stop here.) Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. It appears, as of late, that higher education is one very unhappy family. What with scandals ranging from rape allegations at Duke, […]

Colleagues Abroad

Colleagues Abroad

This issue marks the third time the Adjunct Advocate has devoted an entire issue` to the theme of “colleagues abroad.” Our first “colleagues abroad” issue was published in May/June 2002. Two years later, in our November/December 2004 issue, we again examined the use of part-time faculty at colleges and universities outside of the United States. […]

Coming Out of the Closet

Coming Out of the Closet

by P.D. Lesko It’s time for part-timers to come out of the closet. If it’s December, I must be at the annual extravaganza the Modern Language Association diabolically schedules from the 27th to the 30th of that month. January? I’m at the American Historical Association’s gathering. March Madness in my calendar has nothing to do […]

Suicide of an Italian Lecturer Hits Hard

In November, Sigrid M. killed herself. She taught German at the University of Trieste. She, like I, was a member of a small group of about 1,400 foreigners who teach languages at Italian universities. When I taught in Italy, every non-Italian language lecturer in the country was on a fixed-term contract. Then, a few years […]

Up and Coming

by P.D. Lesko IN THIS ISSUE, you’ll notice a couple of editorial changes. First, we’ve added a new regular feature called “In the Classroom.” There, readers will find information, tips and suggestions directly related to their teaching. The debut column deals with crafting final examinations. The interesting aspect of the column, I believe, stems from […]

Are There Adjuncts in the Social Sciences?

AFTER THE DISCIPLINE of English, the social sciences employ the most temporary faculty, according to a survey conducted by the National Education Association. Part-timers slog away, keeping introductory psychology, sociology, criminal justice and other social science courses staffed. I spent three days in August at the ASA’s Centennial conference waiting for the 5,000 sociologists in […]

Surprises in the Academy (Not!)

by P.D. Lesko News Flash: A Department Education study has found that 62 percent of college faculty with full-time jobs are men. Of the 1.2 million college faculty employed in the United States, 80 percent are white. Shocking news. I know. Especially for the part-time faculty out there, 48 percent of whom are women. Between […]

Conflct at the CCCCs

I attended the National Council of Teachers of English CCCC’s conference this past March. Held in San Francisco, the event spanned three days and included, literally, hundreds of sessions, workshops and panel discussions. Before going, I made use of NCTE’s wonderful new online searchable conference program database. I spent about 40 minutes looking for events […]

The Best Made Plans

I didn’t plan for all of the features in this issue to deal with part-time faculty unionization, but sometimes the best plans simply aren’t made—they happen. So it was when I read about the efforts of the part-time faculty at the Community College of Vermont. There, all of the classes are taught by part-timers. The […]

When The Janitors Earn More Than The Lecturers

by P.D. Lesko Every year, the University of Michigan releases a report which lists the salaries paid to all faculty and staff. I stumbled across a link to the document as I read a blog written by a faculty member at the university. The Excel spreadsheet is some 35,416 rows long. Columns list the employee’s […]