Learning Styles and Distance Education

by Evelyn Beck ATTENTION TO THE way students learn is just as important in on-line classes as it is in the traditional classroom. Yet while most of us regularly design face-to-face activities that involve visual and audio components, group work, and physical movement, we still rely heavily on the written word when delivering courses through the Web. Learning-styles theory suggests that individuals process information differently and that instructors can help more students become successful by varying the way course material is presented. Measurements of learning styles often make distinctions between minds that process abstract versus concrete data effectively and between individuals […]
This article is only available to subscribers. If you're a subscriber, log in. To subscribe, choose the subscription that suits your needs: 1 Year Individual Subscription, 1 Year Library Subscription, 1 Year Academic Department Subscription, 1 Year College Teaching & Learning Center Subscription or 1 Year College Faculty Association/Faculty Union Subscription
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar
News For the Adjunct Faculty Nation
Ad Clicks : Ad Views :