Coaxing the Lion out of its Lair Or, the Challenges and Rewards of Teaching Writing to STEM Students

Coaxing the Lion out of its Lair Or, the Challenges and Rewards of Teaching Writing to STEM Students

by Kris Morrissey Teaching an English Literature class five years ago, the lights went out for no apparent reason. We sat looking at each other, considering the inherent symbolism of light – be it ambient or fluorescent. Then, when nothing happened, our discussion carried on at a deeper, more intense level to match the near […]

Learning Your Students’ Names Really Does Matter

Learning Your Students’ Names Really Does Matter

by Carole R. Beal The new academic year is here, and thousands of students have entered college for the first time. I’ve been teaching college students for a long time, but this year, two developments have led me to think hard about my role as a professor: what it is, or rather, what it should […]

How to Use Cumulative Testing to Enhance Learning Outcomes

How to Use Cumulative Testing to Enhance Learning Outcomes

by Kevin Patton One of the most effective enhancements I’ve ever made to my human anatomy & physiology course was switching to cumulative testing. What I mean by that is instead of testing on each topic once, then moving on to a test on the next topic, I started testing my students on all the covered topics […]

Do This, and Your Students Will Never Miss Class Again

Do This, and Your Students Will Never Miss Class Again

by Bridgett McGowen-Hawkins Senior Digital Educator, Cengage Learning Growing up, you heard the lectures from your parents. And then you went to school and heard even more lectures. And once you arrived in college, you were just about lectured-out. However, now you teach, and you do what you know best. You lecture! Okay, perhaps you don’t—but […]

From Koala to Kangaroo—Getting Your Students Hopping With Active Learning

From Koala to Kangaroo—Getting Your Students Hopping With Active Learning

by Shawn Orr, Digital Educator  You’ve probably seen this chart or another many times over the course of your teaching. Basically, it’s saying that we remember very little of what somebody talks to us about. We remember more if we can see it. We remember much more if we can actually practice it and experience […]

Great Apps to Create Meaningful Connections Inside (and Outside) the Classroom

Great Apps to Create Meaningful Connections Inside (and Outside) the Classroom

by Shawn Orr I love technology! I guess if I’m being completely honest, what I really love is the engagement, excitement, and interactivity that technology brings to my college classroom. I’m not talking about the bells and whistles (although that’s fun, too), but the true engagement that happens when I use technology that really resonates […]

The Mentor Is In: Teaching and Supporting Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

The Mentor Is In: Teaching and Supporting Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

by Steven Volk Planning a route, getting gas and changing a flat tire don’t sound challenging to most young adults, but for students on the autism spectrum at the University of West Florida in Pensacola, FL, it was one of the greatest tests of their independence. Autism Spectrum Disorder is a group of developmental disabilities […]

Tips for Designing and Using Rubrics

Tips for Designing and Using Rubrics

by Andrew Miller Rubrics are a beast. Grrrrrrr! They are time-consuming to construct, challenging to write and sometimes hard to use effectively. They are everywhere. There are rubrics all over the web, plus tools to create them, and as educators, it can overwhelm us. Rubrics are driven by reforms, from standards-based grading to assessment for learning. […]

When Students Don’t Answer—Interpreting the Awkward Silence

When Students Don’t Answer—Interpreting the Awkward Silence

by Paul T. Corrigan One balmy spring afternoon, I asked my students, “What is the difference between being a student and being a learner?” I hoped to start a lively discussion about the purposes of college. Instead, one or two students attempted an answer, while the others sat quietly in their seats, avoiding eye contact with me. The […]

Want to Be An Inspiring Teacher? Answer This Question: Why Do You Teach?

Want to Be An Inspiring Teacher? Answer This Question: Why Do You Teach?

By Bruce A. Johnson, Ph.D., MBA Your work as an adjunct instructor – do you remember how it all began? What initially inspired you to teach? Do you still feel the same today? If you have been teaching for any length of time you probably have a familiar routine established. You understand what’s expected for […]

1 2 3 7