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Home » Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing You are browsing entries filed in “Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing”

Want to Engage the Public in Adjunct Advocacy? Here’s How

Many academics, including us, now realize that if we want to reach people who might benefit from our research, we have to step out of the ivory tower. We academics need to enter the discussion that the rest of the world engages in every day.

Writing for the public requires improving one’s skills, just the way it does for writing an academic article or a grant proposal. Yes, there is a “start-up cost” as you learn the ropes. But it isn’t as time-consuming as many academics may think.

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Adjunct Writes Guidebook on Thriving in the Online Classroom

outside-the-walls

by Cindy O’Dell Taking a completely online class can be a case of sink or swim, says Jeffrey M. Welch, an adjunct professor in the School of Education. After more than nine years of teaching at Brandman in both blended and online classes, as well as seeing how online learning is moving into K-12 classrooms […]

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Plagiarism Doesn’t Bother Me

plagiarism

by Gerald Nelms When I began teaching back in the early 1980s, any student plagiarizing upset me a lot. I experienced exactly what Richard Murphy describes in his 1990 College English article, “Anorexia: The Cheating Disorder”: Plagiarism irritates, like a thin wood splinter in the edge of one’s thumb. With any sort of reasonable perspective, I realize […]

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How American Universities Have Destroyed Scholarship in the U.S.

writing

by Debra Leigh Scott Put simply, universities traditionally have pursued a three-prong mission: 1) to provide excellent educational opportunities, 2) to support scholarly research and study, and 3) to encourage both professional and community service. There has been a lot written recently about how the adjunct situation has negatively impacted our students’ education – and this […]

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Amherst Part-Timer Launches A “Hidden Scholars” Support Group

scholars

by Nick Grabbe Is there a doctorate in the house? If so, an Amherst scholar wants to know — and wants to rally independent scholars, adjunct faculty members and other academics without institutional connections for a new support group that will have its first meeting Thursday. The group, called Hidden Scholars, meets at the Amherst […]

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A First Look at Lore and Bits

Part of what I’ve been doing in this blog is noodling around the questions of how adjunct writers’ circumstances affect their writing (and writing teaching), and, by implication, to what extend adjuncts are working in special circumstances. Well, here’s one answer to that last question: Bedford /St. Martin’s thinks that adjuncts work in different circumstances. […]

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Interview With Dr. Kirk Astle (Part II)

Last week we shared the first portion of an interview with Dr. Kirk Astle, Director of College Writing at Baker College Online. This week we conclude that interview.   Adjunct Advocate: How much of the composition faculty at Baker is full-time?   Dr. Astle: At Baker College Online I am the only full time Composition […]

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Write On! An Interview With Dana S. Dunn

This week we’re shifting focus a bit. Dana S. Dunn is Professor of Psychology at Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Moravian is a small and selective liberal arts college with a long and distinguished history. Professor Dunn has edited several books on pedagogical practices, published scores of articles, and several of his own books, including […]

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Two Writers, One Adjunct, Two Lessons, One Lesson?

I received a brief and surprising email today. The first surprise was that the email arrived at all. You see, I’d emailed Elizabeth Strout, whose complex and often lovely novel in stories Olive Kitteridge. (If you haven’t read Olive Kitteridge, I highly suggest it. There’s a reason it won the 2009 Pulitzer for fiction.) I’d […]

Posted in Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

A First Look at Lore and Bits

Part of what I’ve been doing in this blog is noodling around the questions of how adjunct writers’ circumstances affect their writing (and writing teaching), and, by implication, to what extend adjuncts are working in special circumstances. Well, here’s one answer to that last question: Bedford /St. Martin’s thinks that adjuncts work in different circumstances. […]

Posted in Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

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