Graphic
Home » Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing You are browsing entries filed in “Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing”

Want to Engage the Public in Adjunct Advocacy? Here’s How

Many academics, including us, now realize that if we want to reach people who might benefit from our research, we have to step out of the ivory tower. We academics need to enter the discussion that the rest of the world engages in every day.

Writing for the public requires improving one’s skills, just the way it does for writing an academic article or a grant proposal. Yes, there is a “start-up cost” as you learn the ropes. But it isn’t as time-consuming as many academics may think.

Posted in Blogs,Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

Adjunct Writes Guidebook on Thriving in the Online Classroom

outside-the-walls

by Cindy O’Dell Taking a completely online class can be a case of sink or swim, says Jeffrey M. Welch, an adjunct professor in the School of Education. After more than nine years of teaching at Brandman in both blended and online classes, as well as seeing how online learning is moving into K-12 classrooms […]

Posted in Blogs,Books,Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

Plagiarism Doesn’t Bother Me

plagiarism

by Gerald Nelms When I began teaching back in the early 1980s, any student plagiarizing upset me a lot. I experienced exactly what Richard Murphy describes in his 1990 College English article, “Anorexia: The Cheating Disorder”: Plagiarism irritates, like a thin wood splinter in the edge of one’s thumb. With any sort of reasonable perspective, I realize […]

Posted in Blogs,Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

How American Universities Have Destroyed Scholarship in the U.S.

writing

by Debra Leigh Scott Put simply, universities traditionally have pursued a three-prong mission: 1) to provide excellent educational opportunities, 2) to support scholarly research and study, and 3) to encourage both professional and community service. There has been a lot written recently about how the adjunct situation has negatively impacted our students’ education – and this […]

Posted in Blogs,Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

Amherst Part-Timer Launches A “Hidden Scholars” Support Group

scholars

by Nick Grabbe Is there a doctorate in the house? If so, an Amherst scholar wants to know — and wants to rally independent scholars, adjunct faculty members and other academics without institutional connections for a new support group that will have its first meeting Thursday. The group, called Hidden Scholars, meets at the Amherst […]

Posted in Blogs,Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

A First Look at Lore and Bits

Part of what I’ve been doing in this blog is noodling around the questions of how adjunct writers’ circumstances affect their writing (and writing teaching), and, by implication, to what extend adjuncts are working in special circumstances. Well, here’s one answer to that last question: Bedford /St. Martin’s thinks that adjuncts work in different circumstances. […]

Posted in Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

Interview With Dr. Kirk Astle (Part II)

Last week we shared the first portion of an interview with Dr. Kirk Astle, Director of College Writing at Baker College Online. This week we conclude that interview.   Adjunct Advocate: How much of the composition faculty at Baker is full-time?   Dr. Astle: At Baker College Online I am the only full time Composition […]

Posted in Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

Write On! An Interview With Dana S. Dunn

This week we’re shifting focus a bit. Dana S. Dunn is Professor of Psychology at Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Moravian is a small and selective liberal arts college with a long and distinguished history. Professor Dunn has edited several books on pedagogical practices, published scores of articles, and several of his own books, including […]

Posted in Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

Two Writers, One Adjunct, Two Lessons, One Lesson?

I received a brief and surprising email today. The first surprise was that the email arrived at all. You see, I’d emailed Elizabeth Strout, whose complex and often lovely novel in stories Olive Kitteridge. (If you haven’t read Olive Kitteridge, I highly suggest it. There’s a reason it won the 2009 Pulitzer for fiction.) I’d […]

Posted in Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

A First Look at Lore and Bits

Part of what I’ve been doing in this blog is noodling around the questions of how adjunct writers’ circumstances affect their writing (and writing teaching), and, by implication, to what extend adjuncts are working in special circumstances. Well, here’s one answer to that last question: Bedford /St. Martin’s thinks that adjuncts work in different circumstances. […]

Posted in Negotiating the Paradox: Adjuncts & Writing | Read More »

Keep in Touch With AdjunctNation

Graphic Graphic Graphic

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Archives

Graphic

From the Archive

  • NYU Adjunct Faculty Vote to Strike

    The ACT-UAW Local 7902 — a union made up of adjunct professors from NYU and the New School — has negotiated with and made proposals to the NYU administration for nine months regarding health benefits, equitable pay and compensation, among other grievances. The union recently held a vote to see how many of its members were in favor of authorizing a strike against the university and 94 percent of the union’s 2,500 members voted in favor of the strike.

  • Got Copyright? Resources and Information About Fair Use in the Classroom and On-Line

    by P.D. Lesko IN 1842, CHARLES Dickens and his wife, Catherine, traveled to the United States. While trekking cross country, Dickens often spoke in support of an international copyright agreement. The lack of such an agreement enabled printers in the U.S. to publish his books without permission and without paying the Englishman any royalties. This […]

  • Part-Time Faculty Union Prez Publishes Op-Ed Calling His Own Members “Monsters”

    by Mark James Miller The American higher educational system has created a monster — the out-of-control growth of part-time or adjunct faculty. In its over-reliance on part-time instructors, higher education has built a house of sand. In colleges and universities across the country, budgets are developed and strategic plans made that assume contingent faculty will carry […]

  • Distance Education: Getting Started

    by Jo Gibson Adjunct faculty have a wide comfort zone: they prepare lectures, monitor classroom discussion, devise tests, assign grades–no problem! However, even for faculty with wide-ranging professional skills and experience, on-line teaching can be a hard sell. Consider Dr. David Dutton [pseud.], professor and department chair. Aggressively pursuing additional work to supplement his income, […]

    This article is available for purchase for $1.00 if you do not have a subscription. If you do have a subscription, please [login] here to read the entire piece. If you do NOT have a subscription, please 
    Authorize.Net
    Authorize.Net processes AMEX, Visa, Mastercard and Discover credit card payments made online securely and safely. 
    Paypal Standard
    You do NOT need a PayPal account to use this payment method. PayPal allows credit card payments to be processed safely and securely. PayPal operates with credit cards, debit cards, bank accounts and PayPal accounts to make safe purchases online, without disclosing your credit card number or financial information. 

     Subscribe to our newsletter

    to create an account which you will use to access the article you wish to purchase and read.
  • Supreme Court Could Hear Second Legal Challenge to Forced Agency Fees Paid by Tens of Thousands of Adjunct Union Members

    There is a case pending in the Seventh Circuit, Janus v. AFSCME, in which three Illinois state employees argue they shouldn’t have to pay “fair share” union dues. Whether it’s that case or another, most of the jurists President Trump has proposed would at least be open to the arguments against mandatory dues, Pell said.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Recently Commented

  • Scott: I believe Sami is correct in that this no reasonable assurance language will allow adjuncts continuing access...
  • Nancy West-Diangelo: It’s as if we’ve lost the ability to listen critically. If the point of the work we...
  • Freddi-Jo Bruschke: An excellent description of this editorial.
  • Julia Holcomb: Tolerance certainly doesn’t mean you get to say things you cannot prove, about things that ought...
  • Michele Spino Martindill: White supremacy has had hundreds of years to dominate campus environments and doesn’t...