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Giving Students Feedback Effectively

Feedback should be: Timely Supportive Geared toward improvement Focused on the work, not on the person Selective What does the student most need to know in order to improve? What is the student capable of understanding/doing at this time?What will give the student the biggest “pay-off” in terms of improvement? Give more feedback earlier, less […]

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Encouraging Students to Write and Read by Creating Comics

by Bill Zimmerman Want your students to develop their imaginations, as well as a fondness for reading and writing and telling stories? Then encourage them to create their own comic strips. My own love of comics and understanding of their value as a learning tool began when I was a child. Back then, the very […]

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Speak So Your Students Can Speak

by Stephen D. Boyd, Ph.D., CSP One of the most important skills a person can develop for success in a career is to speak well publicly. As an educator, you have a variety of ways of teaching this life skill, no matter what your subject matter or expertise. Of primary importance is for you to […]

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Handling Disruptive Students

Untitled Document by John McIntosh All behaviors that interfere with teaching and learning in the classroom can be considered to be disruptive. Disruptive behavior can be repeated small actions or a single major event. Here are some strategies for minimizing and coping with behavior that may make instructors feel uneasy, annoyed, or threatened: Know your […]

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Six Tips for Handling Grade Complaints

Untitled Document by Peter Connor It’s a given—students are going to complain about the grades they receive. Also given, is your responsibility to handle such complaints. Generally speaking, this will go far better if you pre-establish your classroom protocols, put them in writing and discuss them on the first day of class. Include a page […]

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Managing Hot Moments in the Classroom

by Lee Warren Sometimes things seem to explode in the classroom, and what do we do then? Knowing strategies for turning difficult encounters into learning opportunities enables us to address important, but hot, topics – religion, politics, race, class, gender – in our classroom discussions. Hot moments occur when people’s feelings – often conflictual – […]

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10 Golden Rules for Writing Multiple Choice Questions

by Elizabeth Armstrong Moore In a classical multiple choice question, a student should choose a correct answer among several (optimally 5) answers. Multiple choice questions consist of three obligatory parts: 1. the question (“body of the question”) 2. the correct answer (“the key of the question”) 3. several incorrect alternatives (the so called “distracters”) and […]

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Setting the Tone for Successful Learning

by Shari Dinkins Years ago, I adopted a dog from a local humane society. At twelve pounds, he was not threatening yet he barked at other dogs, pulled on the leash, and rushed visitors at my door. After investigating several options, I hired a reputable dog trainer to come to my home. I was naive about the training […]

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Teaching Students with Disabilities: A How-To Guide for Part-Time Faculty

by Elizabeth J. Carter Professor Judy Juanita knew right away she was teaching a student with a disability when he showed up in her introductory English class with a computer “as big as a piece of luggage.” Recalled Juanita: “[He] made a big deal of using and hooking it up. It couldn’t help but grab […]

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A Fate Worse Than Death: Tips to Take the Terror Out of Giving Presentations

by Roger Seip What’s scarier to most Americans than spiders, heights, or even death? There hasn’t been a horror movie made about it yet, but more than 75 percent of Americans surveyed report that they suffer from “glossophobia,” a debilitating fear of public speaking. Statistically, far more of us claim that we would prefer death […]

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