When Students Don’t Answer—Interpreting the Awkward Silence

When Students Don’t Answer—Interpreting the Awkward Silence

by Paul T. Corrigan One balmy spring afternoon, I asked my students, “What is the difference between being a student and being a learner?” I hoped to start a lively discussion about the purposes of college. Instead, one or two students attempted an answer, while the others sat quietly in their seats, avoiding eye contact with me. The […]

Plagiarism Doesn’t Bother Me

Plagiarism Doesn’t Bother Me

by Gerald Nelms When I began teaching back in the early 1980s, any student plagiarizing upset me a lot. I experienced exactly what Richard Murphy describes in his 1990 College English article, “Anorexia: The Cheating Disorder”: Plagiarism irritates, like a thin wood splinter in the edge of one’s thumb. With any sort of reasonable perspective, I realize […]

Catholic Colleges Face Religious Objections to Adjunct Income Inequality

Catholic Colleges Face Religious Objections to Adjunct Income Inequality

Gerald J. Beyer,  associate professor of Christian ethics at Villanova University, has posted an interesting journal article that holds Catholic universities accountable for their treatment of poorly paid adjunct faculty. He writes: Some Catholic institutions pay significantly above the national median per course, but the pay rate for most adjuncts on our campuses mostly mirrors […]

Guess Who’s Most Likely to Default on Their Student Loans?

Guess Who’s Most Likely to Default on Their Student Loans?

Student loan default rates have doubled over the last decade, and new research from Adam Looney of the U.S. Treasury Department and Constantine Yannelis from Stanford University, shows most of the increase is associated with the number of non-traditional borrowers attending for-profit schools and two-year colleges. According to Looney and Yannelis’ research, based on analysis […]

At Fordham U Adjunct Fast Shows “Jesuit Just” Movement Gaining Momentum

At Fordham U Adjunct Fast Shows “Jesuit Just” Movement Gaining Momentum

by Katie Meyer Last week, a handful of Rose Hill’s adjunct professors spent the day without food. Their cause? As longtime anthropology adjunct Alan Trevithick explained it, the fast was part of an ongoing campaign that aims to “make visible the poor working conditions, low pay, and non-existent benefits of adjunct…faculty.” These professors, Trevithick noted, […]

Can Student Activists Push Administrators to Raise Pay for PT Faculty?

Can Student Activists Push Administrators to Raise Pay for PT Faculty?

by Brian Min In April 2015, hundreds of students and professors from Columbia supported CU Fight for 15 by demonstrating in front of Low Steps to promote a $15 minimum wage for low-income workers and raising the wages of adjunct professors. CU Fight for 15 continues to be an active organization on campus and recently rallied to […]

Asking Adjunct to Change Football Player’s Grade Costs Rutgers Coach $50K & Suspension

Asking Adjunct to Change Football Player’s Grade Costs Rutgers Coach $50K & Suspension

Read the full Rutgers Report on Kyle Flood here. Kyle Flood, who earns $2.5 million as the head coach of the Rutgers University football team has been suspended for three games as Rutgers football coach and fined $50,000 following a university-led investigation into rules violations and amid a recent string of off-field transgressions involving players on his […]

Once Again Eastern Michigan U Holds up Part-Timers’ Paychecks

Once Again Eastern Michigan U Holds up Part-Timers’ Paychecks

In 2012, AdjunctNation.com reported that part-time lecturers at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan were waiting up to three months for paychecks. The EMU Federation of Teachers said that the union, which welcomed part-time lecturers to its ranks for the first time in 2012, was “taking on the issue.” In 2012 EMU President Susan Martin, […]

A Perspective from Canada—The Wage Gap that Plagues Non-Tenured Faculty is a Political Issue

A Perspective from Canada—The Wage Gap that Plagues Non-Tenured Faculty is a Political Issue

by Gail Lethbridge With Frosh Week drawing to close and Labour Day still fresh in our memory, it’s a good time to ask who is teaching our university students. Many are full-time professors with good pay, health care benefits, vacations, job security pensions and tenure privileges such as sabbaticals. And many are not. About half of […]