Graphic
|

Report Highlights Importance of More Fully Engaging Part-Time Faculty at Community Colleges

Despite the fact that, compared to full-time faculty, community college part-time faculty have less teaching experience, hold fewer advanced degrees, and are not on a tenure track, they are most often assigned to teach students who require more help, says a new University of Texas at Austin report.

According to “Contingent Commitments: Bringing Part-Time Faculty Into Focus,” part-time community college faculty members teach more than half of all credit-earning students and three-quarters of the developmental education classes, yet they tend to be less experienced than full-time faculty members.

The College of Education’s Center for Community College Student Engagement (CCCSE) produced the report drawing on data from more than 70,000 faculty survey responses and more than 30 focus group discussions with part-time and full-time faculty members, administrators and staffers at community colleges nationwide.

“In addition to having fewer years of experience and formal training, part-time community college faculty often face the frustration of feeling marginalized on campus and unaccepted as full partners in the college’s work,” said Kay McClenney, CCCSE director.

Many part-time faculty members report they feel like outsiders on their own campuses because they often:

  • Do not know whether they will be teaching until just days before the term begins.
  • Have limited or no access to orientation, professional development, college services or office space where they can work and meet with students.
  • Rarely, if ever, are invited to join in campus discussions about things the college can do to improve student learning, persistence and completion.

Past CCCSE reports have identified several high-impact practices that, when properly implemented, are proved to boost community college student engagement. Center data analyzed last year revealed the use of these high-impact practices is low across the board, and this latest report shows that part-time faculty members are using the high-impact strategies even less frequently than full-time faculty members.

“With this report we aim to give college leaders tools to better engage part-time faculty so more students have access to the educational experiences and supports they need to succeed academically,” said McClenney.

The report offers college leaders examples and discussion tools in the areas of hiring, setting expectations and orientation; professional development and support; evaluation and incentives; integration of part-time faculty members into student success initiatives; and creation of an institutional culture that embraces the role of part-time faculty members.

“What matters most? Students,” said McClenney. “Providing effective instruction from all faculty and support for the students should be at the heart of community college work.”

The report is part of “Keys to Student Success: Strengthening the Role of Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges,” a CCCSE initiative funded by the MetLife Foundation. The center is a research and service initiative of the Department of Educational Administration’s Program in Higher Education Leadership.

Short URL: http://www.adjunctnation.com/?p=5884

Leave a Reply

Keep in Touch With AdjunctNation

Graphic Graphic Graphic

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Archives

Graphic

From the Archive

  • As the Boy Scouts Always Say: “Be Prepared”

    by Evelyn Beck When it comes to computers, count on Murphy’s Law: if something can go wrong, it will. So to avoid crises ranging from delayed access to destroyed data, plan ahead. Here are a few tips (which you will probably also want to share with your students): Virus protection Virus protection software is a […]

  • A Review of: Stones into Schools by Greg Mortenson

    reviewed by Jay Mathews STONES INTO SCHOOLS Promoting Peace with Books, Not Bombs, in Afghanistan and Pakistan By Greg Mortenson Viking. 420 pp. $26.95 Greg Mortenson’s first book, Three Cups of Tea, was a gravity-defying, wide-screen, wilderness adventure. It began with the author’s failed attempt to climb the world’s second-highest mountain. It included a daring […]

  • Review of The Teaching Professor

    by Mark J. Drozdowski Each week I receive my fair share of unsolicited newsletters of various ilk. For a price, they promise to help me raise more money, become a better public speaker, reduce stress, manage people or time more effectively, or somehow improve my job performance and make me a happier camper. In most […]

  • After Chancellor Proposes 35 Percent Cut For PTers and 4 Percent Bump For FTers—4,265 Union Members Vote to Strike

    by Bill Schackner The longest faculty labor dispute in the history of Pennsylvania’s 14 state-owned universities inched closer to a showdown as union professors voted overwhelmingly to give their negotiators authority to call a strike. Affirmative votes were cast by 95 percent of those taking part in the election, which included more than 86 percent of […]

  • Supplemental Income: Opportunities

    by Evelyn Beck THOSE OF US who teach on-line courses may not be the ones who revolutionized education, but we are among those leading the way as the rest of our peers are pulled with varying levels of enthusiasm into the brave new world of web learning. As a result of our place at the head […]

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Recently Commented

  • Nancy West-Diangelo: It’s as if we’ve lost the ability to listen critically. If the point of the work we...
  • Freddi-Jo Bruschke: An excellent description of this editorial.
  • Julia Holcomb: Tolerance certainly doesn’t mean you get to say things you cannot prove, about things that ought...
  • Michele Spino Martindill: White supremacy has had hundreds of years to dominate campus environments and doesn’t...
  • Anthony Fields: Critique is one thing: preventing someone from even speaking is another. There has been a definite...