The Year in Plagiarism: Really, Should We Care About Cheating?

The Year in Plagiarism: Really, Should We Care About Cheating?

by P.D. Lesko In a few weeks, the 2012-2013 academic year will ease, grind, screech and/or jolt to a stop, depending on one’s perspective. Final exams and essays will be graded by faculty members on whose shoulders the responsibility for policing academic honesty falls. This is a particularly difficult part of the job for non-tenured […]

New Study Blames Tenured Faculty & Their Anemic Teaching Loads For Spiraling College Tuition Costs

New Study Blames Tenured Faculty & Their Anemic Teaching Loads For Spiraling College Tuition Costs

If colleges and universities were serious about making school more affordable, they could start herding professors back into their classrooms. The declining teaching load of tenured professors and tenure-track faculty has boosted the average cost of college per student by $2,598 annually, according to a new study by the Education Sector and The American Council of Trustees and Alumni. Between […]

Professor Procrastination—The Fine Art of Cleaning the Fridge While “Grading”

Professor Procrastination—The Fine Art of Cleaning the Fridge While “Grading”

by Linda Lyle Procrastination is the art of putting off until tomorrow what you don’t want to do today by doing something less distasteful. Usually, people put things off by checking their e-mail or Facebook. When faced with a deadline, I often procrastinate by doing things that make me feel productive while not actually doing […]

The College Budget: There Isn’t Enough Money to go Around. Why Don’t Adjuncts Get It?

The College Budget: There Isn’t Enough Money to go Around. Why Don’t Adjuncts Get It?

By Sandra Keifer It’s good business, isn’t it? We’ve heard it a thousand——no, a million times, and we’re sick of it: the Wal-Mart model. The company that uses this model runs on the backs of hundreds or thousands of low-paid workers, lavishly rewarding executives and higher ed. administrators at the sharp point of the pyramid. Alongside […]

MIT Summit Looks At The Future of Online Learning

MIT Summit Looks At The Future of Online Learning

On March 4, 2013 at the MIT Media Lab, MIT and Harvard University, the founders of the online-learning initiative edX, convened a group of academic leaders and other online-learning experts for a daylong summit meeting titled “Online Learning and the Future of Residential Education.” On hand were, among others, the presidents and provosts of MIT and Harvard; […]

Campus Threats Made in Online Courses—What’s A Faculty Member To Do?

Campus Threats Made in Online Courses—What’s A Faculty Member To Do?

by Kate Mangu-Ward If a student threatens to shoot his classmates (or himself) on the online message board for his physics class, does that count as a campus threat? That’s just one of the many questions purveyors of massively open online courses, or MOOCs, are asking themselves. Universities have traditionally been asked to play many […]

A Post Revisited

by Kelly A. O’Connor-Salomon I was trying to figure out what to write about this week, then I read another blog post that took offense with one of my earlier articles. I think I was misunderstood to a degree, and I wanted to take a moment to respond. First off, as I noted in a […]

After Providing Paid Health Benefits for 31 Years, College Asks 1,000 PTers To Give Them Up

After Providing Paid Health Benefits for 31 Years, College Asks 1,000 PTers To Give Them Up

by Nanette Asimov A raucous rally staged by hundreds of faculty at City College of San Francisco could easily have been mistaken for a run-of-the-mill labor protest, drawing cheers and horn-honking from passing motorists along Ocean Avenue. But the upbeat demonstration, featuring a nine-piece band with horns and drummers, masked a life-or-death issue for the vast college of […]