Graphic
|

Part-Timers Teach the Majority of Courses & Earn Peanuts. So Why Is Higher Ed. So Expensive?

by Anna Durrett

The ability to go to college has long been held as a high water mark of success, so much so that an undergraduate degree is an oft-mentioned predictor of professional success and income. Among other major life choices, the decision to get a higher degree has been seen as a total win-win. The world will be your oyster with a Bachelor’s under your belt, so the logic has always been.

Unfortunately, just as the Great Recession called into question fundamental American institutions and values like home buying and retirement, it has also called into question the affordability and accessibility of college – just as President Obama has made increasing college attendance a cornerstone of his education policy.

Over the last thirty years, college tuition has steadily risen. The cost of tuition at many colleges literally prices out many families who want to send their kids to college. If they do not receive grants or scholarships, these students are obligated to take out loans or give up on a higher degree. Either decision can limit a student’s professional or personal options in the future.

But why is higher education so expensive in the first place?

photoThis query can

To read the rest of this article, you need to be a subscriber and TO PURCHASE A NEW SUBSCRIPTION, select the subscription you want from the drop down menu below, pay and read! 

To RENEW/EXTEND an existing subscription, please  then visit the MY SUBSCRIPTION link found at the top of the page. Do not use this form.  

Authorize.Net
Authorize.Net processes AMEX, Visa, Mastercard and Discover credit card payments made online securely and safely. 
Paypal Standard
You do NOT need a PayPal account to use this payment method. PayPal allows credit card payments to be processed safely and securely. PayPal operates with credit cards, debit cards, bank accounts and PayPal accounts to make safe purchases online, without disclosing your credit card number or financial information. 

 Subscribe to our newsletter

Short URL: http://www.adjunctnation.com/?p=4026

2 Comments for “Part-Timers Teach the Majority of Courses & Earn Peanuts. So Why Is Higher Ed. So Expensive?”

  1. I wish we would… some of us have been talking about it. Take a look at InChorus, Inc.

  2. Why don’t adjuncts form their own university, since the cost of university education is in administration (which they could avoid) and they have the skills to found a successful university.

Leave a Reply

Keep in Touch With AdjunctNation

Graphic Graphic Graphic

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Archives

Graphic

From the Archive

  • Paper Cuts

    by Sylvia M. Gross The college textbook is on track to becoming a relic of the paper-and-ink era. On campuses around the country, professors and students are selecting digital versions of books that can be read off of a computer screen. Most college students are used to going online for music, videos and news — […]

  • Chicago College Gets Slapped With NLRB Unfair Labor Practice Complaints On Behalf of P-Timers

    By Kari Lydersen At Columbia College Chicago, an arts- and media-oriented institution that has expanded greatly and helped revitalize the city’s South Loop, tensions have escalated between unionized part-time faculty and the administration this fall. The federal National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) filed two unfair labor practices (ULP) complaints against the college and is investigating several […]

  • Don’t Poke Me: Professors’ Privacy In The Age Of Facebook

      By Rich Russell Before seeing the new movie The Social Network this past weekend, I first read the article on co-founder Mark Zuckerberg in The New Yorker. His own Facebook profile is quoted in the piece: “I am trying to make the world a more open place.” But an open world does not necessarily […]

  • Community College Faculty: At Work in the New Economy

    by John S. Levin, Susan Kater and Richard L. Wagoner Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2006. 299 pp. $23.50 reviewed by Mark J. Drozdowski I’ve never worked or taught at a community college. After reading this book, I don’t want to. Community college faculty, it turns out, are oppressed, though they may not know it. That’s essentially the conclusion of […]

  • Campus Equity Week is Growing Bigger: But is Bigger Better?

    by Chris Cumo Forget the top-down hierarchy. Talk to anyone in the thick of things and you get the same answer: Campus Equity Week (CEW) is a grassroots movement, one with a protean nature that defies easy summation. CEW began in October 2001 (CEW 1) in the U.S. and Canada and will spread this October […]

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Recently Commented

  • Nancy West-Diangelo: It’s as if we’ve lost the ability to listen critically. If the point of the work we...
  • Freddi-Jo Bruschke: An excellent description of this editorial.
  • Julia Holcomb: Tolerance certainly doesn’t mean you get to say things you cannot prove, about things that ought...
  • Michele Spino Martindill: White supremacy has had hundreds of years to dominate campus environments and doesn’t...
  • Anthony Fields: Critique is one thing: preventing someone from even speaking is another. There has been a definite...