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Part-Timers Teach the Majority of Courses & Earn Peanuts. So Why Is Higher Ed. So Expensive?

by Anna Durrett

The ability to go to college has long been held as a high water mark of success, so much so that an undergraduate degree is an oft-mentioned predictor of professional success and income. Among other major life choices, the decision to get a higher degree has been seen as a total win-win. The world will be your oyster with a Bachelor’s under your belt, so the logic has always been.

Unfortunately, just as the Great Recession called into question fundamental American institutions and values like home buying and retirement, it has also called into question the affordability and accessibility of college – just as President Obama has made increasing college attendance a cornerstone of his education policy.

Over the last thirty years, college tuition has steadily risen. The cost of tuition at many colleges literally prices out many families who want to send their kids to college. If they do not receive grants or scholarships, these students are obligated to take out loans or give up on a higher degree. Either decision can limit a student’s professional or personal options in the future.

But why is higher education so expensive in the first place?

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2 Comments for “Part-Timers Teach the Majority of Courses & Earn Peanuts. So Why Is Higher Ed. So Expensive?”

  1. I wish we would… some of us have been talking about it. Take a look at InChorus, Inc.

  2. Why don’t adjuncts form their own university, since the cost of university education is in administration (which they could avoid) and they have the skills to found a successful university.

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