Graphic
Home » November 29th, 2010 Entries posted on “November, 2010”

Jealousy (Maybe Just A Little)

By P.D. Lesko I’m starting to get jealous of AdjunctNation.com’s Juggling 101 blogger Kat Kiefer-Newman. Her blog posts are shared and shared and shared on Facebook with a regularity that I just can’t seem to match on my own blog. Not that I’m competing. Really. It’s just that her Thanksgiving post “I’m NOT Tarting Up […]

Posted in Adjunct By Choice,Juggling 101,Lesko Blog,Teaching in Pajamas | Read More »

My Students’ Heinous Spelling Is Killing Me

By Kat Kiefer-Newman Note: The following word “lisense” is in no way the fault of my indispensible and acurate-spelling editor. I have another sore throat, and the damp-rainy season here in Southern California has only just started. I’m actually quite healthy, overall, but because I’m in the classroom (closed, cramped, crowded) my immune system just can’t […]

Posted in Juggling 101 | Read More »

Student Engagement and Why It Matters, Part III

By Bruce A. Johnson, Ph.D., MBA Why does student engagement matter? Is it important that your students are doing well in your class and highly involved in the class? Consider the definition of engagement from the first entry in this series. Engagement is an action-based state that consists of the time, energy, and effort that the […]

Posted in The Mentor Is In | Read More »

When A Student Dies

By Melissa Miller, Ed.D., M.Ed. On a sad personal note, I attended two funeral services this week. Both were young men who were killed under very different circumstances and in very different worlds. Both of the deaths were tragic and horrible. One of the young men was a former student of mine who was murdered.  As […]

Posted in The New Adjunct | Read More »

When Using Research, Facts and Statistics in a Classroom Becomes a Liability

By Ron Tinsley I have a news flash for all those “researchers” out there who think they know about adjunct faculty. I am an adjunct, and I use research in my classrooms.   With so much material available online and in newspapers, magazines and academic journals, how do we decide what is trustworthy? For some people, […]

Posted in Adjunct By Choice | Read More »

I’m NOT Tarting Up Thanksgiving in the Classroom (or Anywhere Else) This Year, Thank You Very Much

By Kat Kiefer-Newman It never fails: Students always complain about having to go to class the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Hey! I don’t like having to report to work on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, either. Year-after-year, my husband and I scramble to get everything done before the noon meal, mainly because we both teach and don’t […]

Posted in Juggling 101 | Read More »

Gatorade and Bathroom Breaks: Common Sense Freeway Flying

By Jenny Ortiz There isn’t a training course for being a Freeway Flyer. When I began teaching at three colleges, I had to learn things the hard way.  Keeping Hydrated: Like athletes, Freeway Flyers are constantly on the move. Whether it’s traveling to different campuses or delivering lecture-after-lecture, we are bodies in motion, as Sir Isaac Newton […]

Posted in Freeway Flyer | Read More »

Too Close For Comfort? Navigating Student Relationships As A New Adjunct

By Melissa Miller, Ed.D., M.Ed. As you can see by the picture that is now posted by the byline, I am somewhat young. Dare I admit my age here in the blogosphere? Well, I am thirty-one and yes, that sometimes puts me at the same age or even younger than some of my students. Most […]

Posted in The New Adjunct | Read More »

Chivalry in the Online Classroom: How Often To Log In; How Frequently To Respond

By Rich Russell Upon discovering that I’d become a contributor to a blog about online education, a colleague of mine posed two important questions about our work: How often should we as professors be logging into our classes, and how frequently should we be participating in student discussions? (Thanks for those, Steph.) I thought I’d […]

Posted in Teaching in Pajamas | Read More »

Student Engagement and Why It Matters, Part II

By Bruce A. Johnson, Ph.D., MBA In the first blog of this series there were definitions of student engagement provided, an instructor’s role in the process of engagement was considered, and the following questions were asked: Does active involvement equal engagement? What does student engagement mean to you and to your class? This follow up […]

Posted in The Mentor Is In | Read More »

Keep in Touch With AdjunctNation

Graphic Graphic Graphic

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Archives

Graphic

From the Archive

  • Innocents Abroad

    by Jeannie Barry-Sanders CAREER DECISIONS CAN be a hassle, and if you are at a crossroads in your decision making or just want to gain some extra experience, an international internship just might be the answer. An internship provides an opportunity to travel abroad, examine career options, and to be of service. They can be […]

  • Not Quite 101 Ways to Learning Students’ Names

    by Michael Palmer Building rapport with your students goes a long way toward developing a positive classroom dynamic and facilitating the students’ overall learning experience. One of the simplest ways to begin connecting with your students is to learn their names. What follows is a compilation of some tricks, strategies, and activities which will help […]

  • A Review of Success Strategies for Adjunct Faculty

    by Amy O’Loughlin Success Strategies for Adjunct Faculty by Richard E. Lyons addresses the needs of adjunct professors and provides how-to strategies to improve one’s teaching effectiveness and course management efficiency. The book targets those of you who have established your part-time teaching careers, and it is intended to be a “book you will carry […]

  • Precarious Employment and the Struggle for Good Jobs in the University Sector

    by Dan Crow Precarious employment is one of the hallmarks of what is euphemistically called “the new economy.” It has deep roots in the university sector. Recent decades have seen a move away from full-time secure jobs for academic workers, toward reliance on part-time, contingent, relatively low wage jobs. As a cost-savings measure, and as […]

  • Handling Disruptive Students

    by John McIntosh All behaviors that interfere with teaching and learning in the classroom can be considered to be disruptive. Disruptive behavior can be repeated small actions or a single major event. Here are some strategies for minimizing and coping with behavior that may make instructors feel uneasy, annoyed, or threatened: Know your own students. […]

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Graphic

Want to see your advertisement on
AdjunctNation.com? Click here.

Recently Commented

  • Scott: I believe Sami is correct in that this no reasonable assurance language will allow adjuncts continuing access...
  • Nancy West-Diangelo: It’s as if we’ve lost the ability to listen critically. If the point of the work we...
  • Freddi-Jo Bruschke: An excellent description of this editorial.
  • Julia Holcomb: Tolerance certainly doesn’t mean you get to say things you cannot prove, about things that ought...
  • Michele Spino Martindill: White supremacy has had hundreds of years to dominate campus environments and doesn’t...