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Home » November 29th, 2010 Entries posted on “November, 2010”

Jealousy (Maybe Just A Little)

By P.D. Lesko I’m starting to get jealous of AdjunctNation.com’s Juggling 101 blogger Kat Kiefer-Newman. Her blog posts are shared and shared and shared on Facebook with a regularity that I just can’t seem to match on my own blog. Not that I’m competing. Really. It’s just that her Thanksgiving post “I’m NOT Tarting Up […]

Posted in Adjunct By Choice,Juggling 101,Lesko Blog,Teaching in Pajamas | Read More »

My Students’ Heinous Spelling Is Killing Me

By Kat Kiefer-Newman Note: The following word “lisense” is in no way the fault of my indispensible and acurate-spelling editor. I have another sore throat, and the damp-rainy season here in Southern California has only just started. I’m actually quite healthy, overall, but because I’m in the classroom (closed, cramped, crowded) my immune system just can’t […]

Posted in Juggling 101 | Read More »

Student Engagement and Why It Matters, Part III

By Bruce A. Johnson, Ph.D., MBA Why does student engagement matter? Is it important that your students are doing well in your class and highly involved in the class? Consider the definition of engagement from the first entry in this series. Engagement is an action-based state that consists of the time, energy, and effort that the […]

Posted in The Mentor Is In | Read More »

When A Student Dies

By Melissa Miller, Ed.D., M.Ed. On a sad personal note, I attended two funeral services this week. Both were young men who were killed under very different circumstances and in very different worlds. Both of the deaths were tragic and horrible. One of the young men was a former student of mine who was murdered.  As […]

Posted in The New Adjunct | Read More »

When Using Research, Facts and Statistics in a Classroom Becomes a Liability

By Ron Tinsley I have a news flash for all those “researchers” out there who think they know about adjunct faculty. I am an adjunct, and I use research in my classrooms.   With so much material available online and in newspapers, magazines and academic journals, how do we decide what is trustworthy? For some people, […]

Posted in Adjunct By Choice | Read More »

I’m NOT Tarting Up Thanksgiving in the Classroom (or Anywhere Else) This Year, Thank You Very Much

By Kat Kiefer-Newman It never fails: Students always complain about having to go to class the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Hey! I don’t like having to report to work on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, either. Year-after-year, my husband and I scramble to get everything done before the noon meal, mainly because we both teach and don’t […]

Posted in Juggling 101 | Read More »

Gatorade and Bathroom Breaks: Common Sense Freeway Flying

By Jenny Ortiz There isn’t a training course for being a Freeway Flyer. When I began teaching at three colleges, I had to learn things the hard way.  Keeping Hydrated: Like athletes, Freeway Flyers are constantly on the move. Whether it’s traveling to different campuses or delivering lecture-after-lecture, we are bodies in motion, as Sir Isaac Newton […]

Posted in Freeway Flyer | Read More »

Too Close For Comfort? Navigating Student Relationships As A New Adjunct

By Melissa Miller, Ed.D., M.Ed. As you can see by the picture that is now posted by the byline, I am somewhat young. Dare I admit my age here in the blogosphere? Well, I am thirty-one and yes, that sometimes puts me at the same age or even younger than some of my students. Most […]

Posted in The New Adjunct | Read More »

Chivalry in the Online Classroom: How Often To Log In; How Frequently To Respond

By Rich Russell Upon discovering that I’d become a contributor to a blog about online education, a colleague of mine posed two important questions about our work: How often should we as professors be logging into our classes, and how frequently should we be participating in student discussions? (Thanks for those, Steph.) I thought I’d […]

Posted in Teaching in Pajamas | Read More »

Student Engagement and Why It Matters, Part II

By Bruce A. Johnson, Ph.D., MBA In the first blog of this series there were definitions of student engagement provided, an instructor’s role in the process of engagement was considered, and the following questions were asked: Does active involvement equal engagement? What does student engagement mean to you and to your class? This follow up […]

Posted in The Mentor Is In | Read More »

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From the Archive

  • MIT Summit Looks At The Future of Online Learning

    On March 4, 2013 at the MIT Media Lab, MIT and Harvard University, the founders of the online-learning initiative edX, convened a group of academic leaders and other online-learning experts for a daylong summit meeting titled “Online Learning and the Future of Residential Education.” On hand were, among others, the presidents and provosts of MIT and Harvard; […]

  • New Hampshire Adjuncts Snub AAUP, AFT and NEA & Unionize With SEIU

    Adjunct professors at Plymouth State University (PSU) announced on Tuesday they have filed for an election at the Public Employees Labor Relations Board, which is the first step in forming a collective bargaining unit. The question on the ballot is whether the faculty is for or against organizing and becoming a part of a union […]

  • New Study: Who’s NOT Reading Books in America? (The Answer May Surprise You)

    The share of Americans who report not reading any books in the past 12 months is largely unchanged since 2012, but is slightly higher than in 2011, when the Center first began conducting surveys of book-reading habits. That year, 19 percent of adults reported not reading any books.

  • Introductions Are In Order

    In this blog, I plan to cover teaching from a holistic stand-point. That is, I want to look at how we teach from the position of the whole person, much as we might look at our students. This will include topics like: stress management; organization and priorities; our communication skills and familiarity with technologies such as social media; the physical aspects of the job we often contend with, as well as traditional teaching tips and ideas.

  • Lechers, Psychos & Frauds: Professors Portrayed In Novels Of The Last Fifty Years

    by Laurie Henry Michael Chabon, “Wonder Boys”, 1995; Jane Smiley, “Moo”, 1995; Don DeLillo, “White Noise”, 1985; Gail Godwin, “The Odd Woman”, 1974; Alison Lurie, “The War Between the Tates”, 1974; John Barth, “The End of the Road”, 1967; Randall Jarrell, “Pictures From an Institution”, 1952; Mary McCarthy, “The Groves of Academe”, 1951 AFTER CREATIVE-WRITING professor Grady Tripp […]

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