Home » November 1st, 2006 Entries posted on “November, 2006”

Going Broke, But Teaching Economics

by Don Rich His life as an adjunct collapsed with bitter irony one day when his dean called him into his office to tell him that a colleague had caught him sleeping in the faculty lounge. The dean dressed him down viciously, and then, despite his always having done as he was told and taught […]

Posted in Ivory Tower,Opinions & Ideas | Read More »

The Local Bar An Office Option for the Adjunct

by Matthew Henry Hall Beyond having to pay for drinks, the biggest problem with doing one’s grading at a bar is maintaining proper focus. At a lively bar, overly-libated patrons bustle and bluster about, bumping into you, or worse, wanting to strike up a conversation. “I used to write poetry!” His collar looks like a […]

Posted in A Little Raillery,Opinions & Ideas | Read More »

The Two-Body Problem: Duel-Career Couple Hiring Practices in Higher Education

by Lisa Wolf-Wendel, Susan B. Twombly, and Suzanne Rice The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2006. 196pp. $23.50 by Jessica Demovski WANTED: Academic couple seeks two tenure-track positions at major university in metropolitan area. While an ideal state for many academics, the opportunities that fit these requirements are few and far between. Yet, according to […]

Posted in Books,Reviews | Read More »

Community College Faculty: At Work in the New Economy

by John S. Levin, Susan Kater, and Ricahrd L. Wagoner Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2006. 299 pp. $23.50 reviewed by Mark J. Drozdowski I’ve never worked or taught at a community college. After reading this book, I don’t want to. Community college faculty, it turns out, are oppressed, though they may not know it. That’s […]

Posted in Books,Reviews | Read More »

Opting Off the Tenure-Track: Why Some Faculty Choose a Different Path

by Kristen Kennedy Recent figures put the number of contingent faculty working in colleges and universities at 65 percent of the 1.3 million faculty currently teaching in the United States. We generally read this number as an indicator of where we are in that part of the dance called the corporate turn in higher education. […]

Posted in Features | Read More »

C’mon! You Gotta Fix Me Up! Evaluating Online Bookstores

by Greg Beatty Academics are continually jonesing for a fix. They’re addicted to most seductive of drugs: information. They over-subscribe to listservs and haunt bookstores with longing in their eyes. (Or maybe that’s just me.) Oh, sure, they can always justify their desires. I need it for a class. I’ve got a research project. My […]

Posted in Features,The Net | Read More »


by Evelyn Beck On a recent trip chaperoning my college’s honor society, I asked some of the younger students about MySpace, which recently surpassed eBay to become one of the most popular places on the Web. An astonishing 26.7 million users pointed their browsers to in November 2005, quintupling the number a year earlier. […]

Posted in Columns,Going the Distance | Read More »

The Wal-Martization of Higher Education

by Oronte Churm Sam Walton—huckster, billionaire, icon of the self-made movement—is proof that a representative democracy with a market economy permits class movement if you sell enough discounted panties. The late Walton’s embarrassment of riches was amassed, of course, by providing the appearance of prosperity to the masses, a cornucopia of goods at apparently affordable […]

Posted in Analysis | Read More »

Not Quite 101 Ways to Learning Students’ Names

by Michael Palmer Building rapport with your students goes a long way toward developing a positive classroom dynamic and facilitating the students’ overall learning experience. One of the simplest ways to begin connecting with your students is to learn their names. What follows is a compilation of some tricks, strategies, and activities which will help […]

Posted in Columns,In The Classroom | Read More »

Letter from the Editor

I have been thinking about what it means to be a college faculty member. What does it mean to accept the responsibility of educating young people (not to mention returning students)? It is an awesome responsibility. Hundreds of thousands of part-time faculty accept that responsibility gladly and with every intention of doing the best job […]

Posted in Opinions & Ideas,The Last Word | Read More »

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